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Conferences


Employment Consequences of the Great Recession - September 14-15, 2012

Biographies

David E. Altig is senior vice president and director of research at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. His responsibilities include advising the Bank president on monetary policy and related matters, overseeing the Bank's research department and regional executives, and sitting on the Bank's management and discount committees. Altig also serves as an adjunct professor of economics in the graduate school of business at the University of Chicago. Previously, he was vice president and associate director of research at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, which he joined in 1991 as an economist. Prior to joining the Cleveland Fed, Altig was a faculty member in the department of business economics and public policy at Indiana University. His research focuses primarily on monetary and fiscal policy and has been published in such journals as the Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking; the American Economic Review; and the Journal of Monetary Economics. Altig received a bachelor's degree in business administration from the University of Iowa and a master's degree and a doctorate in economics from Brown University.

Steven J. Davis is the William H. Abbott Professor of International Business and Economics at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, specializing in research on employment and wage behavior, worker mobility, job loss, the effects of labor market institutions, business dynamics, industrial organization, economic fluctuations, national economic performance, and public policy. In addition to publication in numerous academic journals, Davis has published in the Chicago Tribune, Financial Times, Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal and other popular media. He has made television appearances on CNBC, Fox News Channel, NBC News, and PBS, among others. Davis is former editor of the American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics. He is also a research associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research, an economic adviser to the U.S. Congressional Budget Office, a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, and a nonresident visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. Davis earned a bachelor's degree in economics from Portland State University in Oregon, and a master's degree and a PhD in economics from Brown University.

Mike Elsby's research focuses on the interface between macroeconomics and labor economics—in particular, unemployment and wage determination. His recent work has examined the measurement of labor market flows in developed economies, the modeling of worker and job flows over the business cycle and across firms, the economics of adjustment costs, the role of trend wage growth on long-term increases in joblessness, and the aggregate labor market effects of downward rigidity in wages. Elsby studied economics at the London School of Economics, culminating in a PhD in 2005. Prior to joining the University of Edinburgh, he was an assistant professor at the University of Michigan. He is an associate of the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics.

Jason Faberman is a senior economist in the economic research department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. His research focuses on the labor market, in particular on how the interaction between employers and workers affects urban areas and the overall macroeconomy. Faberman's research has been published in the American Economics Journal: Macroeconomics, the Journal of Economic Perspectives and the Journal of Regional Science, among others. Before joining the Chicago Fed in 2011, Faberman served as a senior economist with the Philadelphia Fed and as a research economist with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Faberman received a bachelor of science degree in environmental science and a bachelor of arts in economics from Lehigh University, and a master of science and doctorate in economics from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Henry Farber is the Hughes-Rogers Professor of Economics and a research associate of the industrial relations section at Princeton University. Farber is also a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Fellow of the Econometric Society. Before joining the Princeton University faculty in 1991, Farber was professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has also been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. Farber's current research interests include worker mobility, wage dynamics, the role of information in labor markets, the analysis of dispute settlement mechanisms (including arbitration and litigation), the analysis of voter behavior, and the economics of labor unions. Farber earned a bachelor of science degree from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, a master's degree from the New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University, and a doctoral degree from Princeton University.

Robert E. Hall holds a joint position endowed by Robert and Carole McNeil as a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a professor in the economics department of Stanford University. He is an applied economist with interests in employment, technology, competition, and economic policy in the aggregate economy and in particular markets. Hall served as president of the American Economic Association (AEA) in 2010 and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, Distinguished Fellow of the AEA, and fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Econometric Society, and the Society of Labor Economists. Hall worked with his Hoover Institution colleague Alvin Rabushka to develop a framework for equitable and efficient consumption taxation. They published an article on the topic in the Wall Street Journal as well as a book, The Flat Tax. Hall received his bachelor of arts from the University of California, Berkeley, and his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Erik Hurst, the V. Duane Rath Professor of Economics and the John E. Jeuck Faculty Fellow at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, focuses his research on macroeconomic policy, consumption, time use, entrepreneurship, housing markets, and labor markets. His work has been published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy, and the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking. Hurst's work on leisure trends was written up in the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Economist. Hurst is a member of the Economic Fluctuations Group, Aging Group, and Public Economics Group at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He earned a bachelor's degree in economics and finance from Clarkson University, and master's and doctoral degrees in economics from the University of Michigan.

Nir Jaimovich is an associate professor of economics at Duke University. He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and an associate editor of both the Journal of European Economics Association and the Review of Economic Dynamics. Jaimovich's research focuses on business cycles and the macroeconomic implications of microproduct level data. He was an assistant professor at the University of California, San Diego, from 2004 to 2006 and at Stanford University from 2006 to 2010. Jaimovich received his PhD in economics from Northwestern University and his bachelor's in economics and business administration from Hebrew University in 1998.

Fatih Karahan joined the Federal Reserve Bank of New York in July 2012 as an economist in the Microeconomic Studies Function. His primary research interests include macroeconomics of the labor market and housing market. His current research focuses on the role of geographical mismatch on unemployment during the Great Recession, the persistence of earnings shocks over the lifecycle, and the effect of the returns to skills on the college premium. Karahan received his PhD from the University of Pennsylvania.

Marianna Kudlyak is an economist with the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, with research interests in macroeconomics, focusing on labor markets and business cycles, as well as topics related to mortgage defaults. Kudklyak has published research in Review of Financial Studies and several Richmond Fed publications. She is currently studying the behavior of real wages over the business cycle and its effect on job creation. Kudklyak received her bachelor's degree from the Lviv Polytechnic National University (Ukraine), a master's degree from the Economic Education and Research Consortium at the Kyiv Mohyla Academy (Ukraine), and a master's degree and doctorate from the University of Rochester.

Dennis P. Lockhart is president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. In this role, he is responsible for all of the Bank's activities, including monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, and payment services. He also chairs the Bank's management committee and is a voting member on the Federal Open Market Committee. Prior to joining the Atlanta Fed in March 2007, Lockhart served on the faculty of Georgetown University's Walsh School of Foreign Service, teaching in the master's program and chairing the program's concentrations in international business–government relations and global commerce and finance. He was also an adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins University's Nitze School of Advanced International Studies. Prior to his academic career Lockhart was managing partner at the private equity firm Zephyr Management LP. He also worked at Heller Financial, where he served as executive vice president and director of the parent company and as president of Heller International Group. Previously, Lockhart held various positions, both domestic and international, with Citicorp/Citibank. In addition to his professional activities, Lockhart was a member of the boards of directors of several companies and was chairman of the Small Enterprise Assistance Funds, a not-for-profit operator of emerging markets venture capital funds. He holds a bachelor's degree in political science and economics from Stanford University and a master's degree in international economics and American foreign policy from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

Atif Mian focuses on links between financial markets and the macroeconomy in his research. His work emphasizes the role played by political, governance, and organizational constraints in shaping the effectiveness and scope of financial markets. Mian has published widely on topics such as the origins of the global financial crisis, the political economy of government intervention in financial markets, and the link between asset prices, household borrowing, and consumption. He holds bachelor's and master's degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Andreas Mueller is an assistant professor at the Columbia Business School and an IZA Research Fellow. His research fields include macroeconomics, labor economics, and monetary economics. Mueller has published research in journals such as the Journal of the European Economic Association, the American Economic Review, Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economics Letters, and the Journal of Public Economics. Awarded the Arnbergska Prize by the Royal Swedish Academy of Science in 2012, Muller holds a PhD in economics, IIES, from Stockholm University and bachelor's and master's degrees in international relations from the Graduate Institute in Geneva.

Lee E. Ohanian is professor of economics and director of the Ettinger Family Program in Macroeconomic Research at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he has taught since 1999. He is currently an adviser to the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, and has previously advised other Federal Reserve Banks as well as central banks of other countries and the National Science Foundation. He has been an economic adviser to state and national political campaigns. Ohanian's research, which has recently been discussed in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and other media sources, focuses on economic crises and has been published widely in a number of peer-reviewed journals. He currently serves on the editorial boards of three journals. Ohanian is co-director of the research initiative "Macroeconomics across Time and Space" at the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Melinda Pitts is a research economist and associate policy adviser on the regional team in the research department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. Her major fields of study are health and labor economics. She also serves as director of the Atlanta Fed's Center for Human Capital Studies. Prior to joining the Bank in 2002, Pitts was an assistant professor of economics at Georgia State University, in Atlanta. She also worked as an assistant professor of economics at Salisbury State University in Salisbury, Maryland. Pitts has published in several journals, including Industrial Relations, the American Economic Review, Archives of Internal Medicine, and Research in Labor Economics. She is a member of the American Economic Association, International Health Economics Association, American Society of Health Economists, and the Society of Labor Economics. Pitts received her doctorate in economics in 1997 and her master's degree in economics in 1993, both from North Carolina State University. She received her bachelor of arts in economics in 1987 from Clemson University.

Jesse Rothstein is an associate professor at the Goldman School of Public Policy and the department of economics at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a member of the Board of Editors of the American Economic Review, and an associate editor of Industrial Relations. In 2009–10, Rothstein served as a senior economist for the Council of Economic Advisers and then as chief economist at the U.S. Department of Labor. Rothstein's research focuses on education and tax policy, especially on the way that public institutions ameliorate or reinforce the effects of children's families on their academic and economic outcomes. His work has been published in the American Economic Review, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Journal of Public Economics, the Chicago Law Review, and the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, among other outlets. He earned a PhD in economics from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master's in public policy from the Goldman School.

Edouard Schaal is an assistant professor of economics at New York University. Before joining the New York University faculty, Schaal was a research economist with the Junior Scholar Program at the Minneapolis Fed. His main research topics are macroeconomics and labor economics, focusing on business cycles and optimal policy design. He received his bachelor of science degree from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne and master's and doctoral degrees in economics at Princeton University.

Johannes Friedrich Schmieder is currently an assistant professor in Boston University's department of economics. He is a faculty research fellow with the National Bureau of Economic Research and an IZA research affiliate. He has published research on the long-term effects of unemployment insurance, wage persistence, and other topics in such journals as the American Economic Review, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and the American Economic Journal. Schmieder received his PhD and two master's degrees in economics from Columbia University and a bachelor's degree from the University of Bayreuth (Germany).

Sam Schulhofer-Wohl is a senior economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, with a research focus on risk sharing and migration. Schulhofer-Wohl's work has appeared in the Journal of Political Economy, Review of Economic Dynamics, American Journal of Sociology, and other journals. He is an affiliate of the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development. Schulhofer-Wohl received master's and doctoral degrees from the University of Chicago, and an undergraduate degree in physics from Swarthmore College. He has served as assistant professor in the department of economics and Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and has lectured at the University of Chicago.

Robert Shimer is the Alvin H. Baum Professor in Economics and the College at the University of Chicago as well as a research associate in the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) Economic Fluctuations and Growth program and a research fellow in the Institute for the Study of Labor. Shimer is cochair of the NBER Economic Fluctuations and Growth "Macro Perspectives" group along with Richard Rogerson and Randall Wright. He is also editor of the Journal of Political Economy.

Eric Smith is a professor and head of the economics department at the University of Essex. He has held a visiting scholar position at the Federal Research Bank of Atlanta and was a visiting professor at Rutgers University, Georgetown University, and other universities. Smith's research focuses on labor economics, macroeconomics, and public economics and industrial organization. He has published his work in such journals as Macroeconomic Dynamics, the Journal of Human Capital, Economic Letters, Labour Economics, the Review of Economic Dynamics, and International Economic Review. Smith received a bachelor of arts from Williams College in 1983 and a PhD from the University of Philadelphia.

 

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