Regional Economics Information

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Data & Analysis

Agriculture - April 2008

Data Sources on the Web
U.S. Department of Agriculture
U.S Drought Monitor
Excel logo Data
Prices Received by Farmers—Poultry
Prices Received by Farmers-Poultry
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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture

Excel logo Data
Prices Received by Farmers—Cotton
Prices Received by Farmers-Cotton
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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture

Excel logo Data
Prices Received by Farmers—Oranges
Prices Received by Farmers-Oranges
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Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture
Data and Analysis

Agriculture

April 2008

Recent rains improved soil moisture levels across the region. Rains relieved most dry areas of Florida, with the exception of the southwest region, which is still reporting moderate drought conditions.

Growers across the region noted higher costs of fuels, fertilizer, and feeds. Market conditions for local poultry and cotton remained favorable, led by strong global demand and the lower value of the U.S. dollar. However, market conditions for Florida's citrus growers are less favorable, in part because of higher production in Brazil.

Poultry
Cotton
Citrus

Poultry
With nearly $8 billion in cash receipts in 2007, poultry is the Sixth District's most important cash-producing farm sector. Poultry producers are currently enjoying strong demand from Russia, China, and Mexico. After weakening for most of 2006, poultry prices have recovered strongly through March 2008. Broiler exports in early 2008 rose about 12 percent above record levels in 2007.

Cotton
Cotton growers are also benefiting from strong global demand. Higher textile mill production in China, India, Pakistan, and Turkey has benefited U.S. export shipments. Currently, U.S. exports of cotton contribute to about 71 percent of cotton farm cash receipts.

Citrus
District citrus production, which is concentrated in fifty-five Florida counties, reported $1.4 billion in farm receipts for 2007. However, increased production in Brazil, rising pest and disease control costs, and a sharp spike in energy prices have dampened the profit outlook for citrus growers.


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