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Data & Analysis

Agriculture - April 2009

Data Sources on the Web
National Cotton Council
U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
U.S. Drought Monitor
 
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Prices Received by Farmers—Poultry
Prices Received by Farmers-Poultry
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Source: USDA

Excel logo Data
Prices Received by Farmers—Cotton
Prices Received by Farmers-Cotton
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Source: USDA

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Prices Received by Farmers—Oranges
Prices Received by Farmers-Citrus
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Source: USDA
Data and Analysis

Agriculture

April 2009

Heavy rains soaked most District farm areas, curtailing field work activities but improving moisture levels across most of the region. For the first time in several years, most areas in Alabama and Georgia were declared drought-free. However, showers dampened only a few areas of the Florida peninsula, and these areas were still abnormally dry according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. With dry topsoil moisture conditions across south Florida, citrus trees in inadequately irrigated groves were rated as poor by the USDA.

Poultry
Cotton
Citrus
Peanuts

Poultry
Weak domestic and global demand continues to trouble the near-term outlook for the District's poultry industry. Production in early 2009 was 10 percent below 2008 levels in response to lower domestic and global sales. Adverse economic conditions have affected sales to major markets, but lower prices for leg quarters have recently boosted some shipments to Mexico, Cuba, and other midsize markets. However, these gains were offset by declining shipments to Russia and China, the United States' leading world markets.

Cotton
Lower mill consumption, domestic and global, continues to dominate the uncertain market conditions for cotton in early 2009. Cotton future prices have recently recovered some lost ground, but demand will likely remain soft, limited by the ongoing global economic and financial crisis. The USDA's most recent estimate is not encouraging; it shows domestic and foreign mill use declining from a year earlier. The National Cotton Council estimates that cotton acreage in 2009 will be 14 percent lower than last year, with acreage in Georgia and Alabama down by 17 and 33 percent, respectively.

Citrus
Florida's orange crop was adversely affected by below-freezing temperatures in February. The USDA recently reduced its 2009 forecast for the Valencia crop by 3 percent because of large inventories and sluggish consumer demand. Prices though March 2009 were down 18 percent from 2008 levels.

Peanuts
The recent salmonella outbreak had a significantly negative effect on the local peanut industry. Peanut acreage in Georgia and Alabama, the first- and second-largest U.S. peanut producers, is down sharply; some growers reportedly switched to corn and soybeans to avoid the troubling market outlook for peanuts.


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