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Data & Analysis

Agriculture - February 2009

Data Sources on the Web
U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
U.S. Drought Monitor
 
Excel logo Data
Prices Received by Farmers—Poultry
Prices Received by Farmers-Poultry
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Source: USDA

Excel logo Data
Prices Received by Farmers—Cotton
Prices Received by Farmers-Cotton
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Source: USDA

Excel logo Data
Prices Received by Farmers—Oranges
Prices Received by Farmers-Citrus
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Source: USDA
Data and Analysis

Agriculture

February 2009

Recent rainfall varied across District farm areas. Favorable soil moisture conditions were reported in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee, but some areas in Alabama and Florida remained abnormally dry. Florida plant nurseries saw a decrease in demand from landscapers. Weak domestic and global market conditions continued to affect the growth of regional cotton and poultry producers. The recent salmonella outbreak had a negative effect on the local peanut industry. The severe drop in consumption and uncertain outlook threatens the economies of several rural communities where major production facilities are located.

Poultry
Cotton
Citrus

Poultry
Continued weak domestic and global demand troubled the near-term outlook for the poultry sector. Lower domestic demand and uncertain global demand led to cutbacks in production and earnings for major poultry processing firms at the end of 2008. A University of Georgia economist reported that for the first time in many years, poultry producers as well as other meat producers will be cutting production because of lower consumption and higher costs.

Cotton
Global market conditions in early 2009 continued to worsen, led by lower textile mill use and higher international production. Cotton prices recently declined as production outside the Unites States increased faster than demand. The National Cotton Council estimates that cotton acreage in 2009 will be 14 percent lower than last year, with Georgia and Alabama acreage down by 17 and 33 percent, respectively.

Citrus
In early February, Florida officials were still assessing the recent freeze's impact on Florida's $9 billion citrus industry, with no serious damages reported thus far. For 2009, growers are still challenged by a national recession that has resulted in large orange juice inventories and sluggish consumer demand.


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