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Take On Payments, a blog sponsored by the Retail Payments Risk Forum of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, is intended to foster dialogue on emerging risks in retail payment systems and enhance collaborative efforts to improve risk detection and mitigation. We encourage your active participation in Take on Payments and look forward to collaborating with you.

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September 4, 2018

The First Step in Risk Management

One of the main objectives of information security is having a solid risk management strategy, which involves several areas: policy, compliance, third-party risk management, continuous improvement, and security automation and assessment, to name a few. This diagram illustrates at a high level the full cycle of a risk management strategy: adopting and implementing a framework or standards, which leads to conducting effective risk assessments, which then leads to maintaining continuous improvement.

Chart-image

One of the main objectives of information security is having a solid risk management strategy, which involves several areas: policy, compliance, third-party risk management, continuous improvement, and security automation and assessment, to name a few. This diagram illustrates at a high level the full cycle of a risk management strategy: adopting and implementing a framework or standards, which leads to conducting effective risk assessments, which then leads to maintaining continuous improvement.

There are more than 250 different security frameworks globally. Examples include the National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity, the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI)®, and the Center for Information Security's Critical Security Controls. (In addition, many industries have industry-specific standards and laws, such as health care's HIPAA, created by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.) Each framework is essentially a set of best practices that enables organizations to improve performance, important capabilities, and critical business processes surrounding information technology security.

But the bad news is that, on average, 4 percent of people in any given phishing campaign open an attachment or click a link—and it takes only one person to put a company or even an industry at risk. Does your overall strategy address that 4 percent and have a plan in place for their clicks? The report also found that the more phishing emails someone has clicked, the more they are likely to click in the future.

So, outside of complying with legal and regulatory requirements, how do you determine which framework or frameworks to adopt?

It depends! A Tenable Network Security report, Trends in Security Framework Adoption, provides insight into commonly adopted frameworks as well as the reasons companies have adopted them and how fully. Typically, organizations first consider security frameworks that have a strong reputation in their industries or for specific activities. They then look at compliance with regulations or mandates made by business relationships.

This chart shows reasons organizations have adopted the popular NIST Cybersecurity Framework.

Improving-critical-infrasture-cybersecurity-graph

The study found that there is no single security framework that the majority of companies use. Only 40 percent of respondents reported using a single security framework; many reported plans to adopt additional frameworks in the short term. Close to half of organizations (44 percent) reported they are using multiple frameworks in their security program; 15 percent of these are using three or more.

This year, the Federal Reserve System's Secure Payments Taskforce released Payment Lifecycles and Security Profiles, an informative resource that provides an overview of payments. Each payment type accompanies a list of applicable legal, regulatory, and industry-specific standards or frameworks. Spoiler alert: the lists are long and complex!

Let me point out a subsection appearing with each payment type that is of particular interest to this blog: "Challenges and Improvement Opportunities." Scroll through these subsections to see specific examples calling for more work on standards or frameworks.

Organizations need choices. But having too many frameworks to choose from, coupled with their constantly changing nature and the fluid payments environment, can complicate the implementation of a risk management strategy. With so many choices and so much in flux, how did you manage with step one of your risk management strategy?

Photo of Jessica Washington By Jessica Washington, AAP, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

September 25, 2017

Fed Payments Webinar Series Launching

One of the comments we consistently received when we conducted the Mobile Banking/Payments Survey last fall was the desire for the Atlanta Federal Reserve to provide more educational opportunities on current payment technologies and issues. Not only have small and mid-sized financial institutions expressed this need, but so have consumer advocacy groups and law enforcement agencies. Educational efforts, along with research, on payment risk issues are at the core of the Retail Payments Risk Forum's overall mission.

In response to these requests, the Risk Forum is launching a webinar series called Talk About Payments (TAP). The TAP webinars will supplement this blog, forums and conferences we convene, and other works we publish on the Forum's web pages. The current plan is for the webinars to be presented once a quarter. Financial institutions, retailers, payment processors, law enforcement, academia, and other payment system stakeholders are all welcome to participate in the webinars. Participants can submit questions during the event.

We will have our first webinar—titled "How Safe Are Mobile Payments?"—on Thursday, October 5, from 1 to 2 p.m. (ET). The webinar will cover such topics as mcommerce growth, mobile wallets, tokenization, fraud attack points, and risk mitigation tools and tactics.

Participation in the webinar is complimentary, but you must register in advance. To register, go to the TAP webinar web page. After you complete your registration, you will receive a confirmation email with all the log-in and toll-free call-in information.

We hope you will join us for our first webinar on October 5, and for our future webinars. If there are any particular topics you would like for us to cover in future webinars, please let us know.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

 

 

September 18, 2017

The Rising Cost of Remittances to Mexico Bucks a Trend

From time to time, I like to look back at previous Risk Forum activities and see what payment topics we've covered and consider whether we should revisit any. In September 2012, the Risk Forum hosted the Symposium on 1073: Exploring the Final Remittance Transfer Rule and Path Forward. Seeing that almost five years have passed since that event, I decided I'd take another, deeper look to better understand some of the effects that Section 1073 of the Dodd-Frank Act has had on remittances since then. I wrote about some of my findings in a paper.

As a result of my deeper look, I found an industry that has been rife with change since the implementation of Section 1073 rules, from both a regulatory and technology perspective. Emerging companies have entered the landscape, new digital products have appeared, and several traditional financial institutions have exited the remittance industry. In the midst of this change, consumers' average cost to send remittances has declined.

Conversely, the cost to send remittances within the largest corridor, United States–Mexico, is rising. The rising cost is not attributable to the direct remittance fee paid to an agent or digital provider but rather to the exchange rate margin, which is the exchange rate markup applied to the consumer's remittance over the interbank exchange rate. As remittances become more digitalized and the role of in-person agents diminishes, I expect the exchange rate margin portion of the total cost of remittance to continue to grow.

Even though the average cost of sending remittances to Mexico is on the rise, I found that consumers have access to a number of low-cost options. The spread between the highest-cost remittance options and the lowest-cost options is significant.

Figure-11

With greater transparency than ever before in the remittance industry, consumers now have the ability to find and use low-cost remittance options across a wide variety of provider types and product options. To read more about the cost and availability of remittances from the United States to Mexico and beyond in a post-1073-rule world, you can find the paper here.

Photo of Douglas King By Douglas A. King, payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed

 

January 30, 2017

Pssst…Have You Heard about PSD2?

No, I'm not talking about the latest next-generation video gaming console. I am referring to the revised Directive on Payment Services (PSD2) that the European Parliament adopted in October 2015 and that will serve as the legal foundation for a single market for European Union (EU) payments. The original PSD was adopted in 2007 but, according to official statements, the Parliament found that an update was necessary to incorporate new types of payment services, improve consumer protection, strengthen payment transaction security, and increase competitiveness with an expected result of lower consumer fees in the payments processing market. PSD2 applies only to digital payments and must be in force in all EU countries by January 13, 2018.

The directive and subsequent implementation rules that the European Banking Authority* is developing make a number of major changes in the European banking landscape, including:

  • Opens up the regulated financial services system to merchants and processors who might initiate payments on their consumer customer's behalf as well as data aggregator firms. In particular, PSD2 will apply to any financial institutions already operating within the scope of the PSD but will also apply to third parties such as operators of e-commerce marketplaces, gift card and loyalty plans, bill payment service providers, public communication networks, account access services, mobile wallets, and those who receive payment by direct debit.
  • Requires financial institutions, upon the request of their customers, to allow these approved nonbank, third parties significant, but not unlimited, access to the customer's account and transaction data through APIs (application program interfaces). Many financial institutions see having to turn over customer data to potential competitors as a significant threat to the retention of their customer's business as well as concerns with data security.
  • Sets out two-factor customer authentication as an absolute minimum, with additional security such as one-time passwords required for higher-value transactions. The card issuer must actively authenticate all transactions above 10 euros. Critics of these provisions point out that the criminals will have fixed transaction amounts and authentication methodology information to modify their attacks.
  • Supplementing card interchange limits imposed in December 2015, prevents merchants from adding surcharges to payment card transactions. Under the original directive, each country established rules regarding surcharging on card payments. It has been a common practice of European merchants to levy a surcharge on payment card transactions to offset the interchange fee paid to issuers.

While such a comprehensive single package of regulations is unlikely to occur in the United States, various flavors of these items have been and continue to be discussed. Do you favor such types of regulation here in the United States? I suspect the answer depends on your role in the payments ecosystem. I am interested in hearing from you.

Photo of David Lott By David Lott, a payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed



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* Final rules are expected to be published in January 2017.