Small City Economic Dynamism Index

photograph of small city

The Small City Economic Dynamism Index provides a snapshot of the economic trajectory of 400 small and midsized cities across the United States. The index and its underlying data set are tools for leaders working in or on behalf of small and midsized cities. In it, economic dynamism is defined as churning in a local economy that creates the potential to generate positive economic performance. It includes 13 indicators of economic dynamism for metro and micropolitan areas with populations between 10,000 and 500,000.

Interactive Data

Use the checkboxes in the first tab below to select up to five metro or micropolitan areas. The map and the charts on the four other tabs will update based on your selections. Selecting "(All)" on the "Overall Index" tab will display all 400 metro and micropolitan areas on the map but will depopulate the charts on the other tabs.

Highlights

This version of the Small City Economic Dynamism Index has been updated with more than 150 new cities, the most recent data available, and several new indicators and data analysis features.

  • The index is an interactive tool for mapping and comparing cities across measures of economic dynamism.
  • The index ranks 400 small and midsized U.S. cities, defined as micropolitan (with an urban core of 10,000 to below 50,000 population) or metropolitan (with 50,000 to 500,000 population).
  • Economic dynamism is churning in a local economy that creates the potential to generate positive economic performance.
  • Economic dynamism is assessed by changes in 13 indicators in four categories: demographics, economics, human and social capital, and infrastructure.

Index Details

The Small City Economic Dynamism Index was developed to provide a snapshot of the economic trajectory of small and midsized U.S. cities. To create the index, we extracted data on 400 metro and micro areas with populations of less than 500,000. Economic dynamism is measured by changes in 13 indicators across four dimensions: demographics, economics, human and social capital, and infrastructure. Details on the index such as its component indicators, sources, literature, methodology, and references are described in the link below.

View index details

Contact Us

Will Lambe
Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Mels de Zeeuw, Community & Economic Development Research Analyst

Mels de Zeeuw
Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta